CHANGES IN THE ROUTINE BETWEEN CHILD ONE AND TWO

CHANGES IN THE ROUTINE BETWEEN CHILD ONE AND TWO

Instead of having two naps a day she may only be willing to go down for one, with a stage in between when two naps are too many and one not enough, making her ratty and difficult until she adjusts to the new cycle.

Her eating habits should be more adult now with three meals a day and most likely a bedtime bottle or breast feed. She may need a bottle before her nap, but she should be able to drink out of a cup as well. A lot of children become fiercely attached to their bottle at this stage and are seen trailing it everywhere. It is important to remember that sucking is a pleasurable and comforting habit to a baby and it may have to be continued for a long time before the need is overcome. A lot of children become attached to a blanket or soft toy they carry around with them and refuse to part with it no matter how grubby it gets. There is no real evidence to prove that this is a bad thing and you will just have to take comfort from the fact that she will eventually give it up.

Dont try to make her grow up too soon. This is often the case if she is physically big for her age, or there is another child on the way and you want to get her over babyhood before the other child is born. Pressuring her is sure to have the opposite effect. It will make her seek the comfort of her bottle or dummy or doodoo even moTe.

The baby who is constantly drinking from a bottle is a more difficult problem because this can mean that she does not get enough solids because her appetite is diminished by the continual intake of fluid. If your child is almost never without a bottle or dummy during the second year of life, it is a good idea to examine her routine carefully.

Is she getting enough stimulation? Are there enough interesting things to do? Is she talked to, played with, hugged and loved? Is she under too much stress in the form of constant brakes on her behaviour? Is she expected to behave in a way that is not appropriate to her age?

There is no harm in letting your child have an occasional bottle if she needs it, say at bedtime, as long as it does not become her only source of comfort. By the time she really starts to mix with other children at around three she is unlikely to want to be different or thought a baby. Peer group influence will be far stronger than anything you say in making her give up babyish things.

CHANGES IN THE ROUTINE BETWEEN CHILD ONE AND TWO

Maybe You Like Them Too

Leave a Reply

49 + = 52