Ginger Benefits & Information

Caution needed when breastfeeding, in cases of peptic ulceration or gallstones, and if taking warfarin.

When pregnant limit your intake to 2g/day of dried ginger.

Uses

Ginger is a warming herb that gently stimulates digestion. It also stops the feeling of nausea, including nausea during pregnancy, and car or sea sickness.

Ginger Benefits & Information Photo Gallery



Combinations

If you suffer from reflux, ginger tea may be slightly irritating for the inflamed gullet, so mix it with marshmallow leaf; otherwise drink it by itself or with a slice of lemon.

How to take

It is best taken as a tea, made either with a slice of fresh ginger (1g) or a teaspoon of dry ginger powder (1g). Ginger tea bags are just fine.

Dosage

Adults: 1 cup of infusion 1-3 times a day.

Children (2-16years old): adjust the adult dose downwards, depending on the age of the child – see post 6.

Lemon balm Benefits & Information

Uses

Lemon balm is a superb digestive tea that also makes you relaxed and ensures good sleep. When it starts growing fresh in my garden in the spring and summer, I often give it to my dinner guests at the end of the evening to aid their digestion, and many have commented how well they slept afterwards. Lemon balm infusion, made from fresh leaves, has a wonderful green colour, zesty scent and a fresh lemony taste. This tea, whether made from the fresh or the dry herb, is good for people whose digestive problems stem from anxiety, as it is both a digestive aid and a relaxant to the nervous system.

Combinations

It combines well with chamomile and/or meadowsweet, either fresh or dry.

How to take

Use a good handful of fresh leaves (not twigs), shredded into smaller pieces, per pint-sized teapot. You can add honey to this tea, or even a slice of lemon to enhance the natural taste. Dry lemon balm can be used for tea outside the growing season, but is nowhere near as tasty. It is very hard to get a good-quality lemon balm tincture, and tincture made from fresh herbs is preferable to one made from dry herbs.

Dosage

Adults: 1 cup of infusion 1-3 times a day; or 2-6ml diluted with some water, 1-3 times a day, tincture strength 1:5.

Children (2-16years old): adjust the adult dose downwards, depending on the age of the child – see post 6.

Maybe You Like Them Too

Leave a Reply