HOW TO HAGGLE IN SHOPS OR MARKETS

Most shops have set prices and if you are dealing with general sales staff they probably won’t have the authority to offer discounts, unless you are buying in high volume or spending a great deal of money. However, there are exceptions: for example, on large price-tag items like cars, fitted kitchens, furniture and white goods, where there is an expectation of discounts or extras.

It’s always worth asking for a deal. Say to a sales assistant that you’re interested in buying a particular bed and ask if a mattress protector or a couple of pillows can be thrown in, too.

Owner-managers of independent shops may be more willing to offer discounts to regular shoppers, or if you are seen to be dithering about buying three or more high-price items. Towards the end of a sales period you may be able to secure an extra percentage discount on an item if the shop is keen to clear stock.

Markets are better hunting grounds for hagglers looking to lower the asking price. In many countries haggling at market stalls is expected. Remember: only haggle if you are serious about buying. Think about what price you are prepared to pay; between counter offers this should end up around midway between the seller’s proposed price and your lowest starting offer. Be prepared to walk away if you can’t agree a price.

Do be realistic about when you can push for money off purchases in stores and remember that it pays to be polite when asking.

HOW TO HAGGLE IN SHOPS OR MARKETS Photo Gallery



Maybe You Like Them Too

Leave a Reply