WHAT SHOULD YOUR INVITES ACTUALLY SAY?

Well, that depends. Want your wording to tick all the etiquette boxes, or are you aiming for something more casual and personal? These days, you can be as creative or traditional as you want – just as long as you include essential information, like who, what, when and where. Use this suite as inspo, browse stationers’ websites or lean on your pro for a more detailed how-to.

WHAT SHOULD YOUR INVITES ACTUALLY SAY? Photo Gallery



THE MAIN INVITE

At the top, put the names of whoever is footing the bill, meaning those who are hosting the party and technically inviting everyone. If it’s you and your groom but you still want to honour yo ur pare nts, add ‘Together with their families,’ after yo ur names. That also covers a multitude of sticky situations, such as divorces, remarriages, etc. Celine invitation, £455 for 100 sets, rachelmarvincreative.com

THE REPLY CARD

The most traditional RSVP method is a card for g uests to write the ir name o n the ‘ M’ line w ith the appropriate prefix, mark if they’re attending (or not), and send back by the requested date. The ‘number attending’ line at the bottom is optional but helpful for families.

THE INFO CARD

This can come in any form you want, whether it’s a rundown of the weekend’s events or an annotated map of your destination. The goal is to give guests the details they need in a creative yet concise format. It’s a good idea to include your wedding website at the end. See opposite for how to nail the details (and make sure you’re not forgetting anything!). 

A raised image that adds a structural element to your suite. It’s often used for accents, such as crests.

NO MRS. ANDREW ANOEP’ LETTERPRESS

The text and design are pressed into the paper, leaving an impression.

ENGRAVING Like letterpress, but text is raised rather than imprinted.

THERMOGRAPHY A combo of ink and powder creates the 3D feel of engraved type at a lower price point.

DIGITAL PRINTING

Flat text that’s similar to what you can print at home. (This is the most cost-effective process.)

LUCINDA LEPLASTRIER ar OSCAR HOPKINS

giead and mix and h styles! The only o to avoid: digital ith letterpress, .

cause different iper stocks are required.

FOIL STAMPING

Same technique as letterpress, but using shiny metallic foil instead of ink.

(This is the most expensive method.)

ANATOMY OF A GREAT INSERT CARD

Don’t forget these helpful additions to your main invite

O TRANSPORT

Include five local cab numbers, plus the postcodes of your venue(s). If the venue is difficult to find, add a map or satnav co-ordinates. Getting married abroad? Include flight companies and rental car websites. O DRESS CODE A hint in the right direction makes g uests feel more comfortable. It gives you a chance at swerving any comedy bow ties.

O ACCOMMODATION

Include a minimum of five local B&Bs or hotels (and say if you’ve managed to sort out a discount and whether you’re covering their room bill).

O GIFT LIST

Ensure guests can find your list easily online. If you’re asking for money, honeymoon funds or charity donations, give an alternative option for old-school guests w ho’d rather buy a g ift; perhaps a small list at your favourite homeware shop or wine merchant? O TIMINGS A general ‘guide’ to the day, or weekend, allows guests to plan ahead in terms of transport and childcare. If you’re having a small day-after celebration, add the details but note this constitutes an invitation! If you only want a select group, send a separate invite.

O CHILDREN

It’s up to you, but make your stance crystal clear so that parents can book a babysitter or start shopping for a mini outfit.

If you are including kids, ask parents to specify whom they’re bring ing in their RSVP and check whether your venue can supply high chairs. O RSVP Urge guests to reply by a certain date, usually four weeks before the wedding, so that you can finalise numbers with your caterer and get cracking on the table plan. Be warned: you will receive a last-minute ‘Can I bring my new boyfriend?’ text!

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